Abbey Creek, Bow Back River
Abbey Creek, Bow Back River

Lea Valley

Abbey Creek, Bow Back River

2005

Ref. 1.201.05

© Philip Jessup

The Bow Back Rivers are waterways in East London that connect the Lea and Thames Rivers. They once were chockablock with mills powered by tidal changes.

Algae Pool, Lea River
Algae Pool, Lea River

Lea Valley

Algae Pool, Lea River

2005

Ref. 1.202.05

© Philip Jessup

Algae blooms frequently occur in still water along Lee Navigation where water flow is impeded by canal and bridge infrastructure.

Apartment Estate, Three Mills
Apartment Estate, Three Mills

Lea Valley

Apartment Estate, Three Mills

2005

Ref. 1.203.05

© Philip Jessup

Many developers converted derelict industrial property to housing estates along Lee Navigation favouring modern designs that echo the canal's appearance.

Bow Locks, Lee Navigation
Bow Locks, Lee Navigation

Lea Valley

Bow Locks, Lee Navigation

2005

Ref. 1.204.05

© Philip Jessup

Bow Locks served as gates that raised the level of the canals at high tide so boats could pass to and from the Thames. They now keep out the high tide to prevent silting. 

Bridge, Lee Navigation
Bridge, Lee Navigation

Lea Valley

Bridge, Lee Navigation

2006

Ref. 1.205.06

© Philip Jessup

The Lea River is laced with bridges that carry passengers on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) between East London and central London.

Canal Boat Homes, Tottenham Hale
Canal Boat Homes, Tottenham Hale

Lea Valley

Canal Boat Homes, Tottenham Hale

2005

Ref. 1.206.05

© Philip Jessup

Canal boat homes populate the Lea River. Some moorings restrict public use, giving residents greater privacy, but they stir controversy over private versus public access.

Chemical Factory, Lee Navigation
Chemical Factory, Lee Navigation

Lea Valley

Chemical Factory, Lee Navigation

2006

Ref. 1.207.06

© Philip Jessup

Much of the industry along the Lea River has long vanished, but some factories still remain concentrated industrial stretches.

Derelict Factory, Lee Navigation
Derelict Factory, Lee Navigation

Lea Valley

Derelict Factory, Lee Navigation

2005

Ref. 1.208.05

© Philip Jessup

Many derelict buildings like this one were demolished and replaced with sports facilities to prepare for the 2012 London Summer Olympics.

 

Ecological Park, Bow Creek
Ecological Park, Bow Creek

Lea Valley

Ecological Park, Bow Creek

2006

Ref. 1.209.06

© Philip Jessup

This Docklands Light Railway (DLC) bridge carries riders across the lower Lea River through the Limmo Peninsula Ecological Park on to Stratford.

Lillies, Pudding Mill River
Lillies, Pudding Mill River

Lea Valley

Lillies, Pudding Mill River

2006

Ref. 1.210.06

© Philip Jessup

Pudding Mill River is one of the smallest Bow Back rivers, now largely transformed into marsh and wild lilly ponds.

New Homes, Limestone Cut
New Homes, Limestone Cut

Lea Valley

New Homes, Limestone Cut

2005

Ref. 1.211.05

© Philip Jessup

The River Lee Act of 1766 authorized the construction of a new outlet to the Thames River, Limestone Cut. Today this canal is being lined with residential estates. 

Olympic Stadium, City Mill River
Olympic Stadium, City Mill River

Lea Valley

Olympic Stadium, City Mill River

2005

Ref. 1.212.05

© Philip Jessup

In 2008 - 2009, derelict industrial buildings along City Mill River were demolished and replaced with an Olympic Stadium to prepare for the 2012 London Summer Olympics.

Overhead Power, William Girling Reservoir
Overhead Power, William Girling Reservoir

Lea Valley

Overhead Power, William Girling Reservoir

2005

Ref. 1.213.05

© Philip Jessup

Stretches of Lee Navigation serve as corridors for electricity transmission alongside London's reservoirs, where sheep graze on the water infrastructure's' slopes.

Sheep Grazing, King George's Reservoir
Sheep Grazing, King George's Reservoir

Lea Valley

Sheep Grazing, King George's Reservoir

2005

Ref. 1.214.05

© Philip Jessup

Thames Water manages a network of reservoirs along the Lea River, whose slopes provide grazing for sheep. The system supplies most of London with domestic water.

South Marsh, King George's Reservoir
South Marsh, King George's Reservoir

Lea Valley

South Marsh, King George's Reservoir

2005

Ref. 1.215.05

© Philip Jessup

A network of spillways connect Lee Navigation and the Lea River at the south end of the reservoir, creating ideal pastureland for horses.

 

Buy

Spillage Channel, Lee Navigation
Spillage Channel, Lee Navigation

Lea Valley

Spillage Channel, Lee Navigation

2005

Ref. 1.216.05

© Philip Jessup

The Lea Valley is laced with spillage channels that control water levels between Lee Navigation and the Lea River. They are ideal habitats for birds.

Stonebridge Lock, Lee Navigation
Stonebridge Lock, Lee Navigation

Lea Valley

Stonebridge Lock, Lee Navigation

2006

Ref. 1.217.06

© Philip Jessup

British Waterways manages 19 locks along Lee Navigation, including Lock No. 16 located near Tottenham, which can accommodate barges as large as 130 tons.

Turkey Brook #1, Enfield
Turkey Brook #1, Enfield

Lea Valley

Turkey Brook #1, Enfield

2006

Ref. 1.218.06

© Philip Jessup

Turkey Brook is a tributary of the Lea River which courses through Enfield and supports coarse fish such as dace that use to brook to spawn.

Turkey Brook #2, Enfield
Turkey Brook #2, Enfield

Lea Valley

Turkey Brook #2, Enfield

2006

Ref. 1.219.06

© Philip Jessup

Turkey Brook winds through Enfield's suburban enclaves. It was named after Turkey Street hamlet, which dates back to 1441 and was originally called Tokestreete.

Warehouse, Bow Back River
Warehouse, Bow Back River

Lea Valley

Warehouse, Bow Back River

2006

Ref. 1.220.06

© Philip Jessup

Wild areas overgrown with weeds and algae are a stone's throw from  warehouses situated along Marshgate Lane and the Bow Back River.